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All Issues > Volume 17, Issue 3


<< Monday, April 23, 2001 >> St. George
St. Adalbert

 
Acts 4:23-31
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Psalm 2 John 3:1-8
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I DARE YOU TO PRAY

 
"All raised their voices in prayer to God." —Acts 4:24
 

The Lord through His Church has always encouraged us to pray the Bible. The "Our Father" is from the Bible. The "Hail Mary" is mostly from the Bible. The prayers of the Mass and other sacraments are a plethora of Biblical allusions.

Today the Lord invites us to pray Acts 4:25-30. This prayer was originally prayed by the early Church after Peter and John were released from prison. This prayer is to be prayed by servants of God who have put themselves in danger of persecution (Acts 4:29). This prayer is for boldness and "complete assurance" in proclaiming and living God's word (Acts 4:29). God the Father gives this bold assurance by stretching forth His hand "in cures and signs and wonders to be worked in the name of Jesus" (Acts 4:30).

If you are willing to be a servant, even a suffering servant, in the service of evangelization, you qualify to pray this prayer. Because it is a prayer from God's word, this prayer is answered as requested. As we profess our faith, signs and wonders will accompany us (Mk 16:17ff) and grace us with the boldness that a witness for the risen Christ needs to emanate. I dare you to pray Acts 4:25-30.

 
Prayer: Father, teach me to pray as a suffering servant.
Promise: "I solemnly assure you, no one can enter into God's kingdom without being begotten of water and Spirit." —Jn 3:5
Praise: St. Peter cured the paralytic Aeneas in the town of Lydda, and all of its inhabitants "were converted to the Lord" (Acts 9:35). Some 250 years later, St. George, a citizen of Lydda, bore additional fruit from Peter's healing by giving up his life to witness to his faith in Jesus.
 
(For related teaching, order our booklet, Life-Changing Prayers from the Bible or our tape on How to Pray the Bible on audio AV 82-3 or video V-82.)
 
 
Nihil obstat: Reverend Ralph J. Lawrence, December 9, 2000
Imprimatur: †Most Reverend Carl K. Moeddel, Vicar General and Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, December 12, 2000
 
The Nihil obstat and Imprimatur are a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free from doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted the Nihil obstat and Imprimatur agree with the contents, opinions, or statements expressed.
Volume 17, Issue 3
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